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Networkblog.hemmings.comThe Car for the Mountains

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My sister recently found an advertising reprint postcard, circa 1913, that she felt I might enjoy, and I thought it was worth sharing.

I hadn’t heard of the Luverne Automobile Company before, but a bit of research has shown me that they were around from 1906 through 1917. Originally a producer of high-wheelers, the Luverne Automobile Co. began building large touring cars around 1910.

The car shown in this ad, known as the “Montana Special,” was a Model Fifty. This $3,000, seven-passenger touring car rode on a 126-inch wheelbase and was powered by a 50hp Rutenber Motor Company engine.

According to the Standard Catalog of American Cars 1805-1942,

The Model Fifty had been displayed at the 1913 St. Paul Automobile Show and had been judged as just the car to transport the wealthy financiers, Northern Pacific’s James Hill among them, from the rail depot to the posh hotel they owned in the mountains of Montana. It performed so capably that the hotel’s manager wrote an enthusiastic letter of endorsement to Luverne, and the company began calling its Model Fifty the Montana Special thereafter.

As the ad confers, this car is “Especially Designed and Equipped For The Montana Trade:”

We are perfectly familiar with the conditions in Montana, and know from actual experience what the requirements are, and we also know from actual experience that our car will meet these requirements. We specialize in building Automobiles for the hardest kind of service, and naturally have to seek our market in the lcalities where they need such cars.

The Luverne Automobile Company switched to wartime farm truck building in 1917, and after that became a fire apparatus specialty company that remained in business through the 20th century.

We’re curious… are there any Luverne Montana Specials remaining in Montana today?

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